Monday, June 11, 2012

grave post - Bayview Gardens

There was a Doors Open event in Burlington over the weekend and I managed to spend a considerable amount of time at a private family cemetery and at Bayview Gardens Mausoleum. One of the advantages was having people on hand to answer questions. And perhaps to give tours, as happened for myself and one of the volunteers when Robin McKee, who does cemetery tours at the Hamilton Cemetery, happened by. He was quite happy to give an impromptu tour and share what he knew about the building and some of the people within. He also didn't find it at all odd to hear that when I will be in Genoa next week, the only thing I really want to see is the Staglieno Cemetery.

there was a harpist playing softly

and St George slaying a dragon



















and walls full of memories

perhaps the most poignant for me, on this visit, was this memorial vault for those who donated their body to science. a difficult decision for some, and one wonders what happens when the medical students and researchers are finished with your remains.
at McMaster University (as with most university hospitals, I expect) you are respectfully remembered.

it is a shame about that typo, though. another plaque on the wall outside the vault seems to be grammatically correct (which would be doubly important for a university, one would think)

find more memorials at Taphophile Tragics

26 comments:

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    1. I had already seen most of the other buildings, so wasn't disappointed - but I didn't expect to spend so long at these two places!

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  2. Beautiful touch to include a harpist for atmosphere! An incredible place, though I find the clustered memorials - like a supermarket mural - a little disturbing!

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    1. the harpist was a pleasant surprise. I find the whole look of these columbaria and mausolea to look a but cluttered.

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  3. What a fascinating grave site, and I like that memorial wall for those that donated their bodies to science! It's a wonderful gesture!

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    1. it has a very old world look to it, with the stone instead of a plaque on a wall.

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  4. My first time posting for Taphophiles and such a variety of subjects. My uncle donated his body to medical research but I don't think he got a plaque!

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    1. thanks for visiting and commenting.
      I am assuming that the outside plaque represents those (families) who did not opt for an individual spot.

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  5. This is one thing I had not given much thought to.

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    1. nor had I. but it makes perfect sense and would be expected now that I know about it.

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  6. Cemetaries are such tranquil places aren't they. I love walking through very old graveyards as the headstones fascinate me.

    CJ x

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  7. Nice touch of this university. Next time I will looking for the universities in the netherlands if the have the same kind of remembrance. Never thought about it before. Thanks for showing us.

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    1. this cemetery is not attached to the university or the hospital, so you may need to ask which one they have chosen to use.

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  8. Beautiful pictures and a beautiful post.

    Herding Cats

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  9. I'm not expecting a plaque for it, but I do intend to leave what's left of my body to science. I'm hoping to wear it out before they get it though... LOL! Nice gesture nonetheless. You're not really going to travel all the way to Genoa for a cemetery though, are you? That's hardcore taphophile!

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    1. I am not going to Genoa just to see the cemetery, but I will be in Genoa on a cruise next week.

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    2. Sweet, VioletSky! You know I was kidding, right? And I just had a preview of the cemetery on biebkriebels blog... hope you have lots of time to explore this amazing place! Happy travels!

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    3. you are not the first person to say that!!
      I knew, but I am feeling almost as if I am as I am more excited about that part of the trip than almost any other (except barcelona)!

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  10. A nice idea. I like that those who would typically remain anonymous have been remembered.

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    1. dying while serving one's country is considered an ultimate sacrifice deserving of a monument, so should this ultimate sacrifice of ones' body.

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  11. Well you must also have a look at the rest of Genoa, it has beautiful palaces as well. But the cemetery is already a city for its own. You can stay there for hours. Succes.
    Marianne

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    1. I wish I had more time, but I will enjoy all that I manage to see.

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  12. The memorial vault is interesting, wonder if some of the the individuals remembered here have a family memorial somewhere else also.

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    1. there are some well known names in here, so I expect they are included somewhere else on the grounds.

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