Monday, June 1, 2015

Jadran

It was a bit of an eyesore, yet still sad to see her go.
After all, she'd been sitting at the foot of Yonge St in Toronto for 40 years.

The ship was officially called the Jadran, but the restaurant was called Captain John's Seafood and Captain John's is how she was always known by locals and tourists. 
These were taken in 2010, before the city closed the restaurant forever. 


There was an actual 'Captain John' - John Letnik was an eccentric man with big dreams that he could never let go of.  If anyone is interested in the long, sad story of ruin, just google it. There's lots to choose from.  It was once a fine dining, floating restaurant back when Toronto had few fine restaurants and virtually nothing at the waterfront. Those days (of few restaurants and nothing at the waterfront as well as Captain John's being even a good restaurant) ended a long time ago and over the last 20 years or so it has become a rusting relic of its past glory. Letnik got to ride away on her as she was towed to Lake Erie to her new home at a scrapyard and waved to the crowds that lined the shore to watch. 
Below is a time lapsed video of the engine-less ship being towed out of the harbour on Lake Ontario. Watching her being turned around by the two tugs is pretty interesting. 



Hundreds of people went down to Harbourfront to watch, and thousands more watched the live stream video online (yes, myself included)
And then, because it was easy for me to do, I hightailed it down to watch her go through the Welland Canal.
First up is the tug Molly
followed by the braking tug Jarrett, into Lock #2





and a better view as they head to Lock #3
hmm, the bow looks much better
there were pictures on twitter of a couple of raccoons scrambling up the poles which led to (unconfirmed) rumours that there were a 100 or so raccoons on the boat as she was towed away. You're welcome, Port Colborne.

It's been a long time, but I'm back... sharing with Our World Tuesday
and signs, signs

28 comments:

  1. Even without an engine, the ship still looks as if it has some life in it. I can see it used as a movie prop but it sounds like she has now become scrap.

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    1. A movie prop might have been a good idea - mostly it was wanted away from the million dollar condos that have (and are) springing up next to it. And all other attempts to sell it fell apart.

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  2. I'm what my family called a "water rat" - there's nothing like the sea (or a river) to calm my spirit. Your photos help.
    Thank you.
    Please come link up at http://image-in-ing.blogspot.com/2015/06/nesting.html

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    1. Glad I could help :)
      I met a few other photographers who follow the ships going through the canal.

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  3. It is always a shame to see a piece of history slip away.

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    1. So true. This one served its purpose then stayed too long. Every city needs its eccentrics, though.

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  4. It is kind of sad to see Captain's John restaurant come to an end. Great series of photos. Enjoy your day!

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  5. BON VOYAGE! Tom The Backroads Traveller

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    1. I was wondering how the 'Captain' was going to get back to Toronto? I'm assuming that was his problem!

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  6. Kind of sad. I was surprised that he didn't look like a much older man. What happened to the boat/restaurant that made the city close it? Loved your photos too.

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    1. There was/is an issue of almost $1 million in back taxes and berthing fees, but it was eventually closed for public health reasons.

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  7. it's a pity that the restaurant has closed its doors forever.

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    1. It's more a pity that it wasn't a very good restaurant.

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  8. I would've been down there to watch the tugboats pull the ship away. Your photos of them pulling were delightful to see.
    Take 25 to Hollister

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    1. The video gave a much better view of them leaving Toronto than I would have seen were I there, and the Welland Canal was much easier for me to get to. I met one person who was following it through the 7 locks! Now he was a boat geek (self-acclaimed)

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  9. Replies
    1. It was all over the news that day!

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  10. It had become fairly derelict. I wish someone could have fixed it up and reopened. Love that you headed down to Welland, Violet!

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    1. Yes, it was in pretty rough shape. The reviews weren't promising, either!
      Living in Burlington makes such a trip easy :)

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  11. Fine use of an old ship. Great signs. I would be attracted to this place.

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    1. It was a great idea. great photo ops, not so great food.

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  12. Another piece of T.O. history gone to the scrap yard. Great story telling with your photos.

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    1. Thanks, I love a good story, even if does have a sad ending.

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  13. thanks for showing this- the tugs were amazing at turning that ship around! reminded me a bit of dogs herding sheep. I'm sorry that it had to go- pardon me for resenting those people who are so rich that they couldn't appreciate the ship being near them.

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    1. You're welcome.
      I think if it was still in working order and in good condition, they might not have resented it's presence.

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  14. Replies
    1. as mentioned above, it was seized by the city for public heath reasons and the owner owed almost a $1 million in back taxes and fees. there was hope that someone would buy it and do something useful with it, but that came to naught.

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