Monday, April 9, 2012

grave post #15

95 years ago today, co-incidentally also an Easter Monday, began the Battle of Vimy Ridge, long held as the event that marked Canada's birth as a nation when four Canadian divisions of the British army became an assault on Vimy Ridge in northeast France as part of the First World War. The Canadians were determined to succeed where British and French troops before them failed; to capture the key German defensive position.
The Canadian losses were almost 7,000 wounded with almost 3,600 killed.











for those who might be interested in reading about Vimy Ridge here is the link to the wikipedia article







Tonight there was a candlelight vigil at the military section of the cemetery. It was sponsored by Veterans Affairs Canada and the North Wall Riders Association, a group of motorcyclists who are 'dedicated to supporting all Veteran's functions and raising awareness of our Veterans through the motorcycling community. We are an association made up of like-minded individuals wishing to support our military veterans and do so while enjoying the freedom they have fought for and will continue to fight for from the back of our motorcycles.' (from website)


It was dreadfully windy all day (as you can see from the flyer in the first photo that was hanging on for dear life) and it was a never-ending battle to keep all 800 candles lit until sunset (when the wind died down a little). My nighttime photos didn't turn out so well, but here is a sampling of some random shots I took of the very moving event. I did some post processing on some as the sun was getting in the way... and because it is fun to experiment. I also kept some of the pictures small for this post, but clicking the images will embiggen them.







this isn't exactly what Julie expects for her Taphophile Tragics, but it seemed appropriate for today.

16 comments:

  1. It's beautiful.

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  2. That last shot of all the candlelit graves is so peaceful.

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  3. I never think of Canada NOT being independent, so this is an educational post for me to read. Nice photos, too.

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  4. Wat an amazing post! I am sure Julie will love it for TGs and as far I am concerned it is exactly the sort of thing I liek reading about in these types of posts,

    That last shot is a winner - very poignant...

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  5. Very informative post, the candlelit graves are a fitting memorial to brave individuals and your last picture really captures the vigil spirit.

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  6. An intriguing post with a beautiful selection of images representing this special day! All those lined up headstones must have been a very sobering sight. And the last photo generates a sense of quiet respect! Beautiful!

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  7. ITs so comforting to see all the stones in perfect alignment, a beautiful ceremony!

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  8. The lights on the headstones at sunset is a very sobering sight.

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  9. Oh, I must agree with Nick... this is a terrific post for TT. I for one am eager to see and learn about how people view death, give tribute to the departed, and use burial grounds around the world. You've told the story of this vigil wonderfully. I like the poster, and your final shot of the all the candles lit on the markers is beautiful.

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  10. Wow, that last picture is truly stunning. What am amazing way to remember and honour your war dead. It's a shame that we don't do anything like that here int he UK.

    Herding Cats

    http://seathreepeeo.blogspot.com

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  11. You saved the best shot for last. Quite breath taking. A lovely and touching final image.

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  12. Love the post and the very poignant vigil. The losses were huge in WW1 it is great to see that they are not forgotten.

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  13. No no no ... this is spot on, Sanna. I really appreciate memorials, and remembrance of all varieties. We are heading up to our own centenary of achieving nationhood through the heat of battle in 2015, and I expect to cover it extensively. Which reminds me: I must get accommodation in Canberra, if it is not too late already.

    That final shot is stunning in the effect it has on the viewer. Just stunning ...

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  14. it is sad...
    but the memorial like this is very pretty. especially, as the others already said, the last picture. beautiful. and what a work to keep them all lighted!

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  15. Agree this is exactly what the meme is about, there are so many interesting contributions. WW1 saw unbelievable carnage.

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  16. This was a very interesting post on this wonderful memorial to honor those brave men. Your photos are beautiful!

    I volunteer at an historic cemetery in Brooklyn, New York, which is the final resting place of many Civil War Veterans and we did a similar memorial service last year with lighted candles on all the graves. We used the small battery run tea lights inside luminary bags, as we felt they were safer.

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