Monday, January 2, 2012

grave post #1

I'm not sure what brought me into this cemetery on this winter day (obviously last winter since this winter we have had no snow). I drive past it often enough and even at one point used to have it on my delivery route. But I had never actually wandered through it. Located on Spring Garden Road, in an out of the way street across from the Royal Botanical Gardens, the park like setting overlooks the lake. The Woodland Cemetery became Hamilton's second municipal burying ground in 1923 when the York Street Cemetery, that sits across the bay, looked to be becoming full to capacity. There is another, a Catholic Cemetery, just down the road aways. I always wondered about these cemeteries that were so close together.

It was very different than I expected. Maybe it was the newer, more modern looking headstones, although I only walked through a small part of it.  Of course, at the time I did not know any of the history. Now, I have found a new meme, hosted by Julie, down in Sydney, for people who are interested in cemeteries and headstones and I have been looking up some of the history.  As a result, I have also learned a new word - such people are called taphophiles.


So, while I have no idea about the family whose name appears on this headstone (I think the name may be Serbian, but I am not certain), I was most taken with the beauty of it. I love the sleekness and almost austerity of the glossy black stone. And the geometry of the two rectangles held together by the circle possibly has a symbolism I am not aware. 

And there is that view over the water to the harbour.
















If anyone else has a fascination with such grave subjects head over to Taphophile Tragics

28 comments:

  1. Ooo VioletSky, do not worry about how much information you have. I am just a bit of a history-junkie. You post away with what you have and say it in your own voice. I shall be overjoyed to see what you have collected.

    Hah! I arrive here, and your voice is so loud and clear, and wonderfully refreshing. My reproduced comment is not needed.

    There is, indeed, a brittle beauty to the scene you have captured, together with a bench to sit and contemplate. And look at that gleaming marker, with its eerie reflection of others waiting patiently behind. I wonder why the month was etched in Roman numerals? Did not even reach 50.

    A life thought about, is a person commemorated.

    Thank you for your contribution to 'Taphophile Tragics'. It is very much appreciated.

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  2. Oh, I meant to draw attention to that date - I found it strange to have the combination of Arabic and Roman numerals instead of the month being written out in letters or also in arabic numbers.

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  3. It certainly is a beautiful headstone.
    I'm taken by its glossiness too.
    I love the reflections of the other graves I can see in it.

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  4. I wonder if there is a symbolism in the style of this headstone! Like a gateway? Most unusual and fascinating find!

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  5. I do have a fascination with old graveyards and like to walk around in them. I like to read the names and the dates and envision the lives that lie behind them. I'm probably a bit of a romantic and make up more than was there. That's the nature of me, but every life is fascinating, don't you think? Thanks for this post.

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  6. Interesting marker, and very interesting that they put the months in Roman numerals.

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  7. It looks rather stark to me. Though I suppose death is stark.

    Despite this, Happy New Year!

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  8. Delores: you are welcome.

    Dianne: I shall have to return to get more reflections

    Gemma: I have never seen anything else quite like this. Maybe it is two families and one is much smaller in numbers than the other?

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  9. Nora: I also enjoy walking around old cemeteries. I would have no problem living next door to one.

    Gene; I wonder if that some sort of Serbian thing with the dates?

    Isabelle: I tend towards the unfussy and am not actually a fan of all those flowery, ornate gravestones. Oddly, this makes me think of Mies van der Rohe.

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  10. I think those modern gravestones are beautiful in their sleekness as well. I used to like to be in cemeteries and sit beneath a tree to write. I am not sure whether it was the peace or whether it satisfied some romantic, maiden-on-the-moors side of my much younger self. Now I avoid them altogether, perhaps because I now know people who once walked but no longer do. But I think some of them are places of extraordinary beauty.

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  11. I am definitely one of the addicted. And now I know there is a name for it - Taphophile.

    There is something very sleek and beautiful abut this headstone. It has no apparent religious reference; it stands more as a monument to memory.

    I'm so glad I dropped in today. I'm joining Taphophile Tragics.

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  12. I agree these is some much to love about this memorial ... the simplicity and shininess in particular.

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  13. Jeannette: I find cemeteries to be very peaceful places. I used to take my lunch at one (as did several other people in my office) when I worked near a particularly lovely one in Toronto.

    Annie: I'm glad you dropped by, too. And I'm glad you want to try out this new meme.

    Joan Elizabeth: I notice the date is 2002, so he has had this memorial all to himself for a decade almost.

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  14. I love old cemeteries - they are very contemplative places.

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  15. Wait, there's a word for me? Does this mean I can post all the photos I took last year in Turkey of various headwear sculpted into tombstones--like a fez in marble? Yes?

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  16. SAW: I agree, though I know people who are a little freaked out by them.

    Jocelyn: YES!!! Please do.

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  17. It looks eerie against the snow and water. I can hear the footsteps crunching.

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  18. Thanks for this post and the link. I have just learned that I am a taphophile! Thank you. It's a lot better than what my friends call me....."weirdo". I do enjoy looking at tombstones and trying to uncover the story behind them.

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  19. I love old cemeteries. We will be visiting one of the classic New Orleans cemeteries on Friday or Saturday. Those places are very unique. I thought I had posted pics before but I couldn't find any. I'll get some new ones.

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  20. That is one beautiful headstone!!
    Wow!
    Cemeteries are fascinating for sure.
    Hugs
    SueAnn

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  21. Its a beautiful headstone thats for sure.

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  22. I like the headstones very much. They look so plain and sophisticated.

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  23. I love cemeteries. I can just picture myself sitting on that bench, taking in the view. That is a beautiful headstone.

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  24. Yes, that's a very sleek headstone, with a nice reflection, too. I'd guess that this is for a family, with one gone, two to go...? I just discovered Julia's meme, am a taphophile too, and will contribute in weeks to come.

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  25. I tend to wander through cemeteries - thanks for the link.
    Happy New Year to you!

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  26. Count me as a tapophile. I love graveyards and cemeteries. This one looks interesting.

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